Tag: "promos"

Monday Memo: What’s Really ‘Official?’

| November 18, 2019

By Holland Cooke
Consultant

 

BLOCK ISLAND, RI — Everything you say about your station on-air is intended to:

    • Cause listeners to notice that they’re listening in the first place! Diaries don’t measure what people listen to. “Unaided recall” methodology measures what they remember.  Even if you’re in a PPM market, on-air marketing has to cut through all the mental clutter that crowds a listener’s head during the day.  With so many new-tech audio competitors, brand recall is imperative.

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Monday Memo: Promotion, Now More than Ever

| April 29, 2019

By Holland Cooke
Consultant

 

BLOCK ISLAND, RI — On a sales call while visiting a client station, the prospect asked how many listeners we’ve lost “now that everyone has SiriusXM.”  Although we could easily demonstrate satellite radio’s actual penetration, and that our cume is actually up lately, perception is reality, eh?

One of radio’s enduring and painful ironies is that we sell advertising, but many stations DO none…which advertisers notice.  And, conversely, they view stations that do promote as “big;” and they feel that stations’ off-air promotion supports the schedules we’ve sold them.

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Monday Memo: Promos 101

| April 22, 2019

By Holland Cooke
Consultant

 

BLOCK ISLAND, RI –Nothing we say on-air can add listeners. Because the only people who hear promos are already listening.

On-air promotion should accomplish two things:

  1. Add Time Spent Listening by explaining why and how to use the station again another time. Mathematically, that’ll move-the-needle even quicker than a bunch of expensive TV spots or billboards, which do invite sampling, but are inviting everyone.  But your listeners already know you and use you.  So with promos, you’re “buying a spot schedule on your own air,” the most-efficient medium for reaching your own listeners.
  2. Enhance recall. I’m not against ear candy, when promos convey the essence of stations and shows.  But be careful that cute, self-amused imaging doesn’t obscure the message.

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