Tag: "KMAX"

Friday, November 11, 2016

| November 11, 2016

nielsen-meter nielsen_logo-2Nielsen Audio Acknowledges Connectivity Issues. Clients were informed yesterday (Thursday, 11/10) that 8% of installed Nielsen Audio devices across its 48 PPM-markets became inactive. The situation began in week one (11/3 – 11/9) of the December PPM monthly survey. According to a Nielsen spokesperson, “Our panel relations specialists have already been in contact with these homes and all affected panelists have now been sent new PPMs; 49% of the replacement meters are back online. We expect the balance to come online in the next several days.” The spokesperson further notes, “We forecast the percentage of installed and fully operational meters eligible for in-tab will be 97% for the month of December and 92% for week one of December across the aggregate of markets; weighting will adjust for demographic and geographic imbalances.” Lower in-tab, the spokesperson stresses, “doesn’t equate to lower ratings; however, temporarily higher weights may contribute to more variation during the period of time it takes for these panelists to be back in-tab.” Nielsen Audio is doing an analysis to evaluate panel representation and impact to audience estimates and the company plans to share those results during the week of November 21.

philips-bobCBS Radio Promotes Philips to Chief Revenue Officer. The company’s senior vice president of sales since late last year – Bob Philips – is elevated to CBS Radio‘s newly created role of chief revenue officer. CBS Radio president Andre Fernandez states, “Bob’s extensive radio and sales experience make him ideal to accelerate our efforts as we enter a new phase of the business. His deep understanding of corporate, customer, category, and channelcbs-radio-logo strategies will be instrumental in generating new revenue opportunities and ensuring our ability to deliver top-tier financial results.” Philips opines, “It is an exciting time for the radio industry. We have never had more assets at our disposal to meet our clients’ needs and extend their iconic brands. Our radio stations, digital assets, and events are only the tip of the iceberg.” Philips, who currently serves on the RAB Advisory Board and is an officer for the Maryland-D.C.-Delaware Broadcasters Association, previously was the 15-year market manager of CBS Radio’s four-station Baltimore cluster, which includes adult contemporary WLIF “Today’s 101.9,” hot AC WWMX “Mix 106.5,” and sports outlets WJZ-AM, and WJZ-FM “105.7 The Fan.” He has held leadership positions at Infinity Broadcasting and American Radio Systems.

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SiriusXM Adds Ramsey. Starting next Monday (11/14), SiriusXM subscribers get to hear financial advice via “The Dave Ramsey Show” on Sirius channel 145 and XM channel 207. According to SiriusXM senior vice president of digital, talk and content strategy Jason Schramm, “Dave Ramsey is a huge force in the world of personal money management and a significant addition to SiriusXM. Between his immensely popular program and dave-ramsey-colo-springs-300x196bestselling books, Dave has proven himself a top expert in his field. I am thrilled that he has found a second home at SiriusXM, where our subscribers will now be able to get direct feedback about their own finances.” Ramsey Media vice president Brian Mayfield comments, “We are honored and excited to join the SiriusXM family. We are looking forward to experiencing the future growth of this platform and its audience.” Speaking of Ramsey, he sold out his “Smart Money” event yesterday (Thursday, 11/10) in Colorado Springs, where he promoted the event with his affiliate there, News-Press & Gazette Company‘s KRDO. The station’s general sales manager JoAnne Rowley notes, “A Dave Ramsey live event creates a lot of excitement for our audience, advertisers, staff, and attendees. The synergy is amazing.” Pictured from left to right are Rowley, Ramsey, KRDO program director Mike Lewis, and station talk host Chris Brown. It is estimated that Ramsey’s 2:00 pm – 5:00 pm weekday show is heard by more than 12 million listeners each week.

mlb-logo2kinosianmikePPM Analysis: MLB Flagships. Based on data from Nielsen Audio’s October 2016 PPM survey period, TALKERS managing editor Mike Kinosian unveils his final look this year at the performances of Major League Baseball flagships. In this special feature report, you will find charts listing stations by format and (6+) AHQ share; ratings fluctuations from September 2016 to October 2016; ratings comparisons from October 2015 to October 2016; how MLB key stations ranked in their respective markets; and how they did by league/division. Another component – new to this cycle – is a quick-view chart of each flagship’s performance from the start of the baseball season to the conclusion. See it all here.

kiro-fmKIRO-FM Partners to Provide 300 Beds for Area Children. Joining Bonneville Seattle talker KIRO-FM in the “Beds for Kids Project” are the Seattle Police Department, with the support of the Seattle Police Foundation, and Sleep Train. KIRO-FM afternoon drive (3:00 pm – 7:00 pm) hosts “Ron & Don” have been dedicated advocates for the project since its inception twobeds-for-kids years ago, with Ron Upshaw stating, “I am really excited about this opportunity. The thought of a young person not having a bed just breaks my heart. Think about a six-year-old or seven-year-old kid never sleeping in a bed. This will be the first time they ever have their own bed. That’s a big deal for a kid, so I’m very proud to be a partner of this really great event.” Semi-trucks filled with 300 mattresses, box springs, sheet sets, comforters, and pillows were delivered to the Seattle Police Department yesterday (Thursday, 11/10); all mattresses were donated by The Dream Bed. Selected area families will receive their new beds tomorrow (Saturday, 11/12). Seattle police officers Jeremy Wade and Ryan Gallagher created the “Beds for Kids Project” in 2014. Seattle’s latest (October 2016) Nielsen Audio PPM report finds KIRO-FM finishing second (5.7, 6+) behind Hubbard CHR KQMV (6.9, 6+).

drew-cuthbertsonCuthbertson Appointed Entercom Digital Audience Engagement Manager. Midday personality of Townsquare Media Group alternative KMAX “94.3 The X,” Fort Collins-Greeley (Colorado) Drew Cuthbertson is named Entercom‘s digital audience engagement manager. Vice president of digital audience engagement Kim Reis comments, “I am so excited to have Drew on our corporate team. His organizational and analytical skills, combined with his digital creativity and on-air experience, makeentercom him the perfect candidate. I am sure the local teams will be jazzed by Drew’s energy and positive attitude.” Cuthbertson comments, “For my entire professional life, I have been committed to creating great digital content. I am beyond thrilled to bring my passion to a company like Entercom. There are great things on the horizon for us.” Cuthbertson will use data analytics to find opportunities on social media, websites, mobile, apps, database, podcasts, and streaming players. The Colorado State University grad is the founder and director of DC Vocals and was a sales associate and customer service representative for Babies R Us.

talkersten-logoElection Related Stories Dominate Talkers TenTM for Week of November 7-11.  Naturally, Donald Trump’s victory over Hillary Clinton in the presidential race was the most-talked-about story on news/talk radio during the week, landing atop the Talkers TenTM.  Close behind was the GOP’s keeping control of both the House and the Senate at #2.  At #3 was ongoing talk about Hillary Clinton’s email problems, followed by the push for marijuana law reform in several states at #4.  The Talkers TenTM is a weekly chart of the top stories and people discussed on news/talk radio during the week and is the result of ongoing research from TALKERS magazine.  It is published every Friday at Talkers.com.  View this week’s entire chart here.

barrie-allisonWestwood One, Barrie Begin Tactical Talk. Podcast “Tactical Talk with Allison Barrie” debuts today – Veterans Day (11/11). The counter-terrorism expert/television commentator will feature men and women who have served in the United States military, intelligence, and first responders’ space; Cumulus Media‘s Westwood One is providing ad sales representation. Westwood One president/Cumulus Media executive vice president of corporate marketing  Suzanne Grimes states, “Allison is awestwood-one powerful addition to our podcast and on-demand network. She is an astute civilian insider with unique access to defense information and technology that translates into extremely compelling content. We look forward to the high-level guests and storytelling she will bring to our 245 million listeners and our valued advertising partners.” Barrie comments, “I plan to introduce America to ultimate insiders so my listeners can know what they know. Since the guests are my friends, America will get very real, up close and direct experiences. There will be exclusive content, access and reveals, but also lots of humor, courage, adventure, and a whole lot of fun. Westwood One is such a great fit for this authentic, special content. The host of “Fox Firepower,” Barrie writes the weekly Fox Firepower front-page column at FoxNews.com.

blackstone-audioAudio Book Publisher Seeks Talk Show Content.  Not books per se, but noted audio book publisher Blackstone Audio is looking for alternative content to add to their already impressive library, which includes over 12,000 of the world’s most famous book titles brought to life in the audio book format. They have already taken numerous syndicated radio shows, podcasts, and a series of educational classes on various subjects and made them available to consumers through the nation’s libraries, bookstores, and over a dozen online merchandisers as well as Blackstone’s own site www.downpour.com. They invite hosts, stations and syndicators to look through old show archives, current shows and podcasts – including anything from health to automobiles – for consideration.  The path is open to content not previously believed to be audio book possible. Those interested must provide enough content to have more than one eight- to ten-hour volume and no music, unless owned by the contributor.  Blackstone pays a favorable royalty for all sales.  For more information, phone Blackstone Audio representative Larry Harris at 360-809-0224 or email him at talkharris@olypen.com.


thank-youOdds & Sods
. Today’s (Friday, 11/11) “Operation Thank You” on Emmis talker KLBJ-AM, Austin will benefit the Fisher House at Carl R. Darnell Army Medical Center at Fort Hood. The drive will feature remote broadcasts by station personalities Todd Jeffries & Don Pryor (“Todd & Don”), Mark Caesar, Charlie Hodge, Jeff Ward, and Ed Clements ….. Starting next Monday (11/14), Jason Hillery takes on added duties as operations manager for Midwest Communications’ stations in Northeast Wisconsin, which include Green Bay mainstream CHR WIXX willobee“Your #1 Hit Music Station” and Neenah-Menasha country outlet WNCY “Y-100.” Already programming Appleton country station WGEE “Duke FM,” Neenah-Menasha adult hits WYDR “Jack FM,” and sports WNFL, Hillery will program talk WTAQ, as well ….. Owing to the fact his director of broadcast operations position has been eliminated, Willobee will depart Shamrock Communications Reno (Nevada) in three weeks (12/2). Willobee joined the Shamrock Reno cluster seven years ago. He previously spent five years as operations manager/program director of WEQX, Albany, New York.

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TagStation Names Burney National Sales Director. National account executive of iHeartMedia Detroit Mary Burney joins TagStation LLC, the parent of NextRadio, as national sales director. NextRadio vice president of sales Tom Doran comments, “Mary is a perfect fit for this position because she understands broadcast radio consumption, and national advertisers’ need for real time campaign performance. Mary is known for establishing relationships with key decision-makers at national brands and their agencies. The new position of national sales director comes as we are seeing rapid growth in demand for our campaign data. NextRadio data brings detailed insights to advertising campaign effectiveness, helping brands make data-driven decisions about radio buys. Among many others, AllState, Disney, The Home Depot, and Starwood Hotels’ Aloft brands have used NextRadio data to measure audience exposure, lift, demographic reach, and other metrics.” Prior to iHeartMedia, Burney was an account executive with Windsor, Ontario’s Bell Media Radio. She also worked at Clear Channel radio sales; Radio One Detroit; and Interep National Radio Sales.

westwood-one-nfl“Stable” Audiences for NFL National Radio Broadcasts. The network radio partner for the National Football League, Cumulus Media‘s Westwood One, analyzed ratings for the first 13 games in each PPM local market where a national broadcast aired. It found adult 25-54 AQH radio ratings for 13 national primetime NFL games that aired during the September 8 – October 5 PPM survey period are down on average 3.5% compared to corresponding broadcasts a year ago. Factoring out the September 26 national NFL broadcast that ran opposite the first presidential debate, however, the 12-game average NFL radio rating change on Westwood One was -1.3%. According to Nielsen, almost as many people have tuned into NFL games on television this season as last season. A Westwood spokesperson writes, “Time spent watching the NFL on TV might be off due to the election coverage, but the NFL continues to be America’s most powerful media property. Recent radio ratings further showcase the power of NFL programming for advertisers to engage fans. The NFL on Westwood One provides incremental reach and enhanced campaign frequency to TV campaigns.”

harrisonupclosefaroutsmallAd Man Dave Marinaccio Is This Week’s Guest on Harrison Podcast.  Noted advertising executive and innovator Dave Marinaccio is this week’s guest on the award-winning PodcastOne hit series, “Up Close and Far Out with Michael Harrison.”  Marinaccio, a 30-plus year veteran of the advertising industry, is the co-founder and creative director of the Arlington, Virginia-based agency LMO Advertising and has been the artistic force behind numerous marketing campaigns for major, household-name companies and product brandsmarinacciodave including restaurants, hotels, rental cars, transportation services, and branches of the military, among others.  He is also a best-selling author, whose most recent book is Admen, Mad Men, and the Real World of Advertising: Essential Lessons for Business and Life (Arcade, 2015).  Marinaccio also wrote All I Really Need to Know I Learned from Watching Star Trek (Harmony 1995).  Harrison and Marinaccio discuss changes in advertising techniques and challenges that have occurred during the transition from the analogue era to the digital age including the cultural differences between Boomers and Millennials, the role of music in advertising, the nature of creativity and much more.  And, yes, they also talk a bit about Star Trek and Gene Roddenberry’s vision of the future.  To listen to the podcast in its entirety, please click here or click on the “Up Close and Far Out” player box located in the right-hand column on every page of Talkers.com and RadioInfo.com.

Saturday, March 14, 2015

| March 14, 2015

Joe McDonnell #2Joe McDonnell: LA Saddened at Giant-Size Talent’s Passing. How “big” was Joe McDonnell in Los Angeles? Consider this: Friday’s (3/13) lead item for several newscasts on the city’s only all-news station, CBS Radio‘s KNX, was that the 58-year-old McDonnell – widely-known as “Big Joe” or “The Big Nasty” – had passed away. “Big” references regarded his weight, approximately 700 pounds at one time; however, the sports talk host underwent gastric bypass surgery and lost roughly more than half of that. “Nasty” became a handle owing to his highly opinionated nature. The overwhelming majority of those familiar with McDonnell’s exemplary on-air work in Los Angeles would quickly associate him with being a “legendary” or “iconic” sports talk radio “fixture” and that would certainly be accurate. He was, however, among the rarest of on-air talents in the country’s second-largest market, in that, in addition to doing a nightly (7:00 pm – 11:00 pm) sports program (“The Joe McDonnell Experience”) on Clear Channel‘s (now iHeartMedia) KLAC, he also did a Sunday (12:00 noon – 2:00 pm) political talk program (“The Joe McDonnell Show”) on co-owned KTLK-AM (now KEIB). Most recently, McDonnell did fill-in work at KNX. Reaction to his death has continued virtually nonstop, with a who’s who in local and national media, as well as executives of major sports franchises, offering condolences. Los Angeles Angels manager Mike Scioscia knew McDonnell ever since Scioscia first came up as a catcher in the Dodgers’ organization. “He was a good friend who will be missed. It’s sad,” Scioscia states. On Twitter, Keith Olbermann writes, “Heartbroken to learn of death of LA radio legend, my friend, Joe McDonnell. He leaves us having never held a grudge.” Ken Rosenthal comments, “So sad to hear about the passing of Joe McDonnell, a one-of-a-kind sports personality in Los Angeles and a reporter at heart.” Several years ago, TALKERS managing editor Mike Kinosian, then the special features editor for Inside Radio, did an extensive profile of McDonnell, who freely used the word “idiot” to describe someone with whom he disagreed. It was a trademark of the bombastic on-air persona of “The Big Nasty” and customarily delivered in vitriol by the dean of Los Angeles radio sports talk hosts. McDonnell garnered legions of dedicated fans. Once – to benefit charity – he accepted the challenge of co-workers and successfully completed a four-hour shift without uttering one negative. In his profile, Kinosian shattered the myth about McDonnell and let the truth be told that in real-life, McDonnell was a far cry from the manic personality listeners were accustomed to hearing. Pensive and completely conscientious McDonnell qualified as a native Angelino, havingJoe McDonnell - Josh Hamilton relocated from Philadelphia in 1959 at age three with his parents. “I loved radio and wouldn’t go anywhere without it,” he fondly recalled to Kinosian. “I’d go to bed listening to it and wake up with it. I went through radios [as others] went through socks. Even when doing homework, I had the radio on.” Although thoroughly enthralled by the medium, McDonnell at that time never thought about pursuing a career in it. Family members urged him to be a lawyer, but McDonnell formulated sportswriter aspirations while attending L.A. Valley College and Cal State – Northridge. His radio career was, in his words, “a total accident.” A high school buddy McDonnell hadn’t seen in a while told him he received academic credit for working at a radio station. That was all it took for McDonnell: He scored an interview for a newsroom opening at KGIL in Los Angeles’ San Fernando Valley and his first day was September 18, 1975 – the day they arrested Patty Hearst. “I was so excited to be there and hung around to watch what everybody did. Then the story broke and I wound up staying until 10:00 pm. I fell in love with radio my first day and knew this was for me.” Freelance sports opportunities later surfaced for him at Mutual, AP Radio, and UPI Radio and he adroitly transitioned into a daily field correspondent. Play-by-play was briefly tinkered with, but long enough for McDonnell to know it didn’t captivate him. Something else did and as he flatly asserted to Kinosian, “My interest in politics is equal to my interest in sports. They are jobs but they are [also] passions. I love being able to show another side of my life. I am very liberal but do not [rubber-stamp] everything simply because that is what [other liberals] say you should do. I take things on a position-by-position basis. It is impossible and disingenuous to be one way on every subject. No one can ever accuse me of being a phony.” The first Gulf War was underway when he hosted a general talk show on KFI, Los Angeles. America’s first casualty came as a result of friendly fire. Soon after that, the victim’s widow drove to KFI one Sunday afternoon and McDonnell did two hours with her. “It was the most gut-wrenching, yet most fulfilling, thing I’ve done on radio,” he told Kinosian. “Quite honestly, I didn’t know I was capable of pulling it off. People heard me do sports and wondered what I knew about [politics]. I had to win them over.” Multiple Golden Microphone award winner McDonnell toiled in the Southland at KMAX and KWNK between 1994 – 1997; won raves doing sports updates for (then-all news) KFWB; and was part of the original 1992 staff transitioning KMPC to all-sports – although the outbreak of the L.A. riots was the considerably more monumental story the night of the format flip. For numerous personal and professional reasons, a five-year run beginning in 2000 as KSPN “ESPN 710,” Los Angeles’ assistant program director and afternoon driver profoundly affected him. “My first three years there were great,” McDonnell declared to Kinosian. “I had a say in what went on and helped build KSPN from the ground up with [KABC & KSPN OM] Erik Braverman who was my KFI producer. Unfortunately when Erik decided he wanted to concentrate on KABC, they brought in people who didn’t share our ideas.” It was one different concept after another and became the beginning of the end for McDonnell there. “They killed morale and dissolved everything we did. I wanted to leave every day the last two years I was there but made so much money I would’ve been put in a mental institution if I quit.” From the minute McDonnell walked into the Burbank offices of KLAC to interview with KLAC general manager/program director & KTLK program director Don Martin, he sensed something different. “This might sound crazy – but I really liked that they made me earn my position. Don put me on KTLK and let me do some KLAC fill-in. It meant a lot when he said I assimilated with the audience and staff. People have this idea you expect everything be given to you.” Being a sports talk host was a 24 hour-a-day job for McDonnell because, “Information doesn’t stop.” His shows were frequently punctuated with “24” and “Da Ali G” clips and laced with abundant/energetic hip-hop tracks as bumpers. At first, longtime “McDonnell – Douglas” partner Doug Krikorian wasn’t part of the equation for the “Joe McDonnell Experience,” although the Long Beach Press-Telegram sportswriter joined the ensemble to deliver weekly “K-Files” reports. After all, it was Krikorian who hung the “Big Nasty” moniker on McDonnell when Big Joe collared/disposed of a rowdy patron one night at their favorite hangout. Naturally, the subject of McDonnell’s weight came up in the Kinosian profile of him and McDonnell said that even before the gastric bypass procedure, the heavy burden he was carrying didn’t really bother him. He did however eventually begin slowing down, getting sick, and spending more time at home. “I stopped going to games because it was uncomfortable. My doctor told me I had to do something. Any addict – and I’m definitely a food addict – thinks you can do it on your own.” That’s the fallacy and something an addict desperately wants to believe but McDonnell stressed it can not be done alone. “It got to the point where I realized I was going to die. I had the surgery and lost 300 pounds. On Christmas Day, I put slabs of turkey and prime rib on a plate [surrounded with] potatoes, stuffing and cranberry sauce. I took it to the table and had a bite of each. Hey look – I’m a food addict and always will be.” The old Joe most likely would’ve avoided on-air surgery mentions. If it did pop up, he probably would’ve been brutal in challenging the person referencing it. A much mellower McDonnell made a conscious decision when he left KSPN that the “Big Nasty” had died. “It was a great vehicle for what I needed – but – that really isn’t me,” he emphasized to Kinosian. “I’m opinionated and will raise my voice but I’m a nice guy and like to have fun. One reason I love my job is it allows me to hang with people.” Conceding it was a “shortcoming” on his part as a talk show host to refrain from mentioning much about his personal life, McDonnell declared, “You can’t be isolated and expect to reach your audience; you have to let them in on your life. For the most part, I refused to do that. Don Martin and I had a long talk about that and he said the best on-air people let you know about them.” A happy, healthy, and exuberant McDonnell chatted up his March 30, 2007 wedding to KLOS’ lovely Elizabeth Cohn (now working at cross-town Bonneville-owned KSWD “The Sound”). “I finally met someone who will put up with me and I [married] the most Joe McDonnell #3wonderful person in the world,” McDonnell emphasized in that profile. Joe and Elizabeth worked together for four years inside ABC Radio Los Angeles (now Cumulus Media) and basically didn’t say a word to each other. “She understands I’ll occasionally make fun of her on-air and exaggerate things but my life is now an open book.” Numerous health ailments – some nearly life-threatening – plagued McDonnell and he frequently credited Elizabeth as being the rock who held him together. An avowed movie junkie, McDonnell would go to as many as three or four in one day. It was his way to relax and escape. “One of the biggest benefits of losing weight is I can fit into theater seats. That was honestly a problem before.” Such McDonnell segments as “Who Do You Want To Kick Out Of LA?” gave him a Northeast-sounding vibe, but his entire nearly 40-year career was spent in Los Angeles. The ardent WWE fan told Kinosian, “It would take a million dollar offer for me to leave Los Angeles. In the early-1990s, I had a chance to work for a friend in Nashville and had a big offer to go to Seattle in 1994 but my mother had cancer so I wasn’t about to leave town. There was a preliminary discussion years ago with WFAN, New York about being a reporter/weekend host but Los Angeles is my home. I’m part of the radio landscape.” Eerie now, but McDonnell confided to Kinosian in that lengthy printed conversation, “All the stuff I’ve done is leading up to something. I’ve always felt there was a bigger plan for me and a different path. God has kept me around for a reason – but I don’t know what it is. With what I’ve put myself through, any other person would have been dead by now.” Even at his heaviest, the voracious reader managed to stay in “fairly good shape.” The only weakness until recently was with his knees. According to McDonnell, “The ultimate moment for me would be to somehow find out who really killed John F. Kennedy.” As for the once “Big Nasty,” no cause of death was reported; several reports – including the one on KNX – said he died at Los Angeles’ Good Samaritan Hospital after a “brief illness.” A two-hour Friday night (3/13) Jeff Biggs-hosted show on KSPN paid tribute to McDonnell, who typically aired hisJoe & Elizabeth McDonnell “Kick Out” segment Fridays. Poignant, touching, and chillingly appropriate, the final word was given to Elizabeth McDonnell who somehow managed to summon up the strength in her voice to utter she wanted to kick Joe out of LA. Dramatic, goose-bump radio. “When I die,” McDonnell once told Tom Hoffarth of the Los Angeles Daily News, “I want to be cremated and then have a plane spread half of my ashes over Dodger Stadium and the other half over the [ex-home of the Lakers] Forum.”

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