Category: Business

David Field’s Internal Memo Regarding USTN Lawsuit

| August 7, 2018

“Under the terms of our former agreements with USTN at the time of our November 17, 2017 merger with CBS Radio, USTN was obligated to pay Entercom about $47 million per year in exchange for a large portion of our highly valuable traffic and other short duration inventory. In the 8 1/2 months that have elapsed since our merger with CBS Radio, USTN has paid us a grand total of just $3 million out of the $33 million we were originally entitled to under our former agreements. As a result of this, and factoring in unpaid accounts receivable due to Entercom as of closing the CBS Radio merger, we have taken a financial hit of greater than $35 million over that time period, significantly impacting our earnings and our cash flow.

“We were told by management at USTN and GTN (USTN’s parent company at the time of our merger with CBS Radio) that USTN had significant financial challenges that precluded them from paying us. Nonetheless, we spent months working tirelessly, constructively, patiently and in good faith with GTN and USTN to help solve USTN’s significant challenges. We made enormous financial concessions, bending over backwards to be supportive of USTN’s efforts to fix their problems. Initially, we worked with GTN on finding a solution until they sold the company to USTN’s American management for a ‘nominal’ sum. We then worked collaboratively with USTN management and in April 2018, we agreed to make a number of enormous concessions to give USTN some relief and time to right the ship. At the time of this restructuring, we were owed $23 million. In this restructuring, we agreed to dramatically reduce the amount that USTN paid us each month. We converted a portion of what they owed us into a minority equity position in USTN, and we converted the remainder into a Senior Secured Debt obligation of USTN which provided USTN with additional time to pay what they owed.

“When it appeared to us that despite our financial concessions, USTN was not making sufficient progress to solve their fundamental problems, we reached an agreement on June 30 to acquire the remainder of the company in exchange for what they owed us plus approximately $1 million, all subject to our due diligence.  What we found during our diligence review was unsatisfactory. We were disappointed to find that their financial condition and projected performance fell significantly short of what we had been led to believe. In addition, USTN management had fallen short on a number of other objectives in their turnaround plans and we first learned about a number of contingent liabilities. Based on our diligence, we informed USTN management that we were exercising our contractual rights and would not be completing the merger. USTN then filed a lawsuit against Entercom which is baseless, frivolous and insulting and attempts to blame Entercom for USTN’s financial problems and make us look like the bad guys. On July 24, 2018, USTN failed to pay us $1.3 million which was then due under our revised agreement for the June broadcast month. On July 31, 2018, USTN failed to pay us $5 million which was then due under our senior secured note.

“The facts are clear: Entercom has received only $3 million out of the original $33 million due under the agreements in place at the closing of the CBS Radio merger. Entercom did not create this problem; USTN did.  Entercom has bent over backwards to work constructively and patiently with USTN to help them fix their problems. We have made enormous financial concessions to help them. And yet USTN still has not demonstrated that they are able to make ends meet, failing to make their required payments to Entercom for June and failing to make a $5 million required payment on their restructured debt to Entercom. USTN management can conjure up a ridiculous lawsuit and engage in name-calling, but it can’t change the facts or the truth of what has occurred here. USTN has failed to meet its obligations over many months. Entercom has acted with great restraint for many months, but we cannot continue to invest our time, resources and capital in a business that has been unable to fix its own problems. We have moved on and are glad to be in control of our own destiny with our valuable traffic inventory, but given the ridiculous allegations by USTN, I wanted to make sure you were fully familiar with the facts and understood that we have acted ethically and responsibly throughout this painful situation.”

Ten Radio Groups Support NAB’s Owner Cap Modification Stance – Open Letter

| August 7, 2018

“In recent months, the Federal Communications Commission (“FCC”) has signaled that, after more than two decades, they are open to revisiting the outdated rules that govern the local ownership of radio stations. Because of this unique opportunity, our industry, working with the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB), undertook a project to develop a radio industry proposal that could be presented to the FCC ahead of its 2018 quadrennial ownership review to help frame the next generation of these rules.

“Months of work by NAB board members and staff recently culminated in the NAB’s proposal to modify the current rules, which was sent to the FCC’s media bureau chief on June 15. Prior to its submission to the FCC, this proposal had been developed and vetted by a special committee of the NAB Board formed for this purpose, as well as by the full radio board itself. At both the committee and board level, the proposal to revise the ownership limits was debated and voted upon openly, and, at both levels of review, it passed with a substantial majority of support (it bears clarifying that what some have pejoratively characterized as ‘a faction’ was in fact a substantial majority).

‘As we believe this is an issue of paramount importance for the future of the radio industry, we have taken an active part in these discussions, and, like others, we have further studied the issues involved so that we may come to a carefully considered decision.  We wanted to share our conclusions in this regard, in the hope that it helps to clarify the public dialogue on this topic.  To be clear, we are fully supportive of and have endorsed the NAB proposal.

“It might be helpful to start with a little history as to why these rules exist. Regulation of public airwaves emerged in the 1930’s out of an effort to manage interference across the radio spectrum. Broadcast media ownership rules were introduced in 1940: the driving force then, as it has been for the many modifications that have taken place in the last 80 years, was the government’s desire to ensure that no one entity could exert too much influence over the flow of information, either nationally or in a single community.

“Reflecting the dynamic nature of media competition, these rules have undergone several modifications over the eight decades of their existence, each time to relax common ownership limits to reflect the competitive impact from changing technology. The proposal that the NAB sent to the FCC is simply the latest logical development in a conversation that dates back to 1940 and which, for the past eighty years and in each modification, has only been moving in one direction.

“The current numerical ownership limits were established by the Telecommunications Act of 1996. In the 22 years since then, the emergence of digital and social media, not to mention the pervasive use of smartphones and other devices, has fundamentally disrupted how information is disseminated locally and nationally. The competitive landscape for information, as well as audio entertainment, has changed dramatically. In radio, our main competitors (Facebook, Google, Spotify, Pandora, YouTube and SiriusXM, for example) did not even exist in 1996. And yet, our rules are based on that era.

“Given the vastly different competitive landscape in the information marketplace, it follows logically that the rules that were intended to limit advantage and undue influence must themselves adapt or be eliminated altogether. The rules that were originally intended to level the playing field for other competitors 80 years ago are now a constraint that inhibits radio’s ability to compete, as well as attract capital and investment. After all, on the internet, none of our competitors are subject to any of these limitations, nor were Sirius and XM subject to similar limitations to prevent their merger ten years ago.

“In addition, we would note that there are several other important factors that further reinforce our decision on this topic: First, ownership restrictions limit the ability of local stations to take advantage of economies of scale that could bolster the industry’s financial position at a time of unprecedented competition. For radio companies to continue to serve the public interest by providing local news, local sports, local weather, and essential emergency programming, these companies need to be economically viable entities, free to compete for assets, capital, and resources on a level playing field with their competitors.

“Second, common ownership will drive more format diversity, as the NAB noted in its letter to the FCC. This serves the best interests of both audiences and advertisers.  Companies will use their additional stations to experiment and develop new and micro-targeted formats, rather than compete with their existing stations. These new formats will serve specific communities and demographics in ways that most of commercial radio does not do today. This will help radio serve its audience better by providing greater consumer choice, serve its advertisers better by offering broader audience reach, and help our industry compete with the virtually unlimited channels and micro-targeted audio audiences offered by digital and satellite competitors.

“Finally, while elimination of the cross-ownership restrictions between radio, TV, and newspapers by the FCC in 2017 was a welcome and long overdue step (particularly for the newspaper business, where we believe this step, if enacted a decade ago, could have helped to save hundreds of companies and thousands of jobs), it seems counter-intuitive to us that radio companies are now allowed to expand into other forms of media, but not to expand our offerings in radio itself.  Cross-ownership only makes sense if it is also accompanied by the opportunity and choice to expand within our own industry, and in the form of media that we know best.

“At the same time, we are of course aware of the arguments against modification of the ownership rules and have considered them carefully in arriving at our conclusions. We have heard an argument that the NAB’s proposal will hurt the value of AM radio. As significant owners of AM radio stations, we have an abiding interest in the value of these assets. Nevertheless, our self-interest does not override the fact that media ownership rules were not intended to provide economic subsidies or determine winners and losers, and to use them in that way today, to advance the interest of one class or company in particular, is a perversion of their intent. Rather, the best way to ensure the value of AM stations, and to deliver for the listeners of this service, is to provide essential and important programming, and unique and valuable benefits to advertisers. In that regard, we can point to several AM stations that continue to be successful: Entercom’s [all-news siblings] WINS and WCBS-AM in New York and [all-news] WBBM-AM in Chicago, as well as iHeartMedia’s [news/talk] KFI in Los Angeles.  These were four of the top ten billers in our industry in 2017.

“Of course, it is also a reality that many AM stations are struggling in today’s competitive environment.  We think that the FCC has already addressed this issue through its AM Revitalization Effort and has given AM stations, and their owners, every available opportunity to ensure their success and longevity, short of stepping in to interfere with the functioning of a free market. This would not be the appropriate role of a regulatory agency, nor would it comport with the free market principles to which we subscribe.

“We have also heard an argument that common ownership offers no benefit to the advertiser. We disagree, and, as noted above, believe that the benefits of common ownership that accrue to the listener in the form of greater format diversity will also benefit the advertiser. Our experience in competition with digital media has been that a key point of differentiation between offline and online advertising is the latter’s ability to micro-target audiences for an advertiser, based on very specific audience characteristics. We know that advertisers value this capability, and that it drives dollar shifting from radio to digital. In conjunction with investment into and development of our own data collection and advanced audience insights, the prospect of being able to offer a greater number of unique formats, along with the localism that is our medium’s hallmark, will enhance radio’s ability to present a competitive advertising solution versus digital and social media. Yes, it is better for our advertisers if we can deliver a better product.

“Complete agreement on any issue is difficult, but given the opportunity before the FCC right now, it was vital that we find consensus. Therefore, we are pleased that the NAB was able to develop a proposal that represented the consensus of a substantial majority of its board of directors, and we thank the staff members of the NAB and the members of the ownership committee (that was formed for this purpose) for their service to the industry. Anything short of providing the FCC with a framework for reforming the radio ownership rules would have been an abdication of the job that the NAB and its board are obligated to perform.

“We respect dissenting views on this topic and hope that our thoughts, as expressed in this letter, have added to the public discourse. We know that all opinions are the result of strong feelings about what is in the best future interests of this industry, which we all love.”

Podcasting Gets an ‘Upfront Showcase’ with Advertisers

| September 15, 2015

By Jeff McKay
TALKERS
Special Features Correspondent

mckayjeffwriterNEW YORK — Peter Senerchia, Cari Champion, and Farnoosh Torabi.  One is a former champion professional wrestler known in the ring as Taz, one is a TV reporter and anchor for ESPN, and the other works in her Brooklyn apartment.  However, all three have something in common – they have carved out their own niches and become stars in the world of podcasting… and with their advertisers.

Digital audio has been on a roll over the past 18 months, and this is especially true among younger listeners.  A February survey by Edison Research found approximately 46 million people listened to podcasts in February.  Meanwhile, ad spending on podcasts is soaring.  A recent survey by eMarketer says ad spending for digital audio is expected to reach $2.75 billion, up over 27% from a year ago.

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AM Radio — What Do We Do About It?

| August 20, 2014

By Bill Brady
Futures & Options, Inc.
President/CEO

 

bradybillJUPITER, FL — No entity has suffered more from the disastrous effects of radio consolidation than AM radio.  No format has suffered more than news/talk.  The fates of both are intertwined.

News/talk isn’t just a different format, it’s a different business.  News/talk stations used to be stand-alone operations managed by broadcasters who nurtured and cared for them.  They were sold by dedicated sales teams who knew well the format’s ability to bring customers through their client’s doors.

With the dawn of consolidation, news/talk stations suddenly found themselves in big station clusters with managers who were preoccupied with their other stations.  Often, these were music station GMs without news/talk backgrounds — and they weren’t at all prepared for the cranky, petulant, expense-laden news/talk AMs they were suddenly forced to deal with.

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| August 15, 2014

Radio’s Precarious Financial Position: Are We at the Tipping Point?

| August 15, 2014

By Bill Brady
Futures & Options, Inc.
President/CEO

JUPITER, FL — The recent Wall Street quarterly earnings calls for radio’s publicly traded companies were pretty alarming.  In three quarters radio has gone from slow growth to no growth to negative growth in an astoundingly short period of time.

Those in denial will try to explain it away by blaming it on the Olympics or the World Cup — or because radio is a “mature industry.”

The real worry here is that 15 years of post-consolidation chickens are finally coming home to roost.  Homogenized programming, time-spent listening declines and the decimation of sales departments are now taking their toll.

Corporate radio apologists have been heard to say, “Stop talking about the good old days, get used to the industry as it exists today.”  Well, the truth is, there’s a lot wrong with how radio operates today.

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Media Broker Spotlight – Harold Bausemer, RadioStationsForSale.Net

| October 8, 2013

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Talkers RadioInfo composite 2This week’s spotlighted broker:

Harold Bausemer  • RadioStationsForSale.Net

bausmerharold

Bergman, Sandi rev_81313

 

This interview was conducted by Sandi Bergman

 


Sandi:  What did you do before becoming a media broker?

Bausemer:  Spent most of my time in radio and real estate.  I am also a real estate broker.  My radio business experience has been mostly operational as an AE, SM, GSM, GM, COO of small radio group and owner operator. I worked for a company called Group W for 10 years which bought and then became CBS Radio. I loved the business from the start. Real estate can be very lucrative but is tedious at best.

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Media Broker Spotlight – Diane Warren and Jean Robinson, MMTC Media Brokers

| October 1, 2013

Talkers RadioInfo composite 2This week’s spotlighted brokers:

Diane Warren and Jean Robinson  •  MMTC Media Brokers  (run by Bounceology)

warrenandrobinson

Bergman, Sandi rev_81313

 

This interview was conducted by Sandi Bergman

 

 

Sandi:  What did you do before becoming a media broker?

Warren:  Jean and I both came to our MMTC work with decades of radio broadcast experience. We both worked for the Clear Channel corporate team prior to the leverage buy out. Jean comes to this work with legal and operational experience. I come to this work with operational, strategic and deal experiences. Together we have done over 200 deals for David Honig of MMTC. We work with buyers, sellers and companies who chose to DONATE stations to MMTC. We can find ideal minority, multicultural and women buyers for these properties. It’s a win for everyone.

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Media Broker Spotlight –
Jon Yinger, Broadcast Properties, LLC

| September 24, 2013

Talkers RadioInfo composite 2This week’s spotlighted broker:

Jon Yinger  •  Broadcast Properties LLC

yinger,jon

Bergman, Sandi rev_81313

 

This interview was conducted by Sandi Bergman

 


Sandi:  What did you do before becoming a media broker?

Yinger:  I have been and still am owner of a group of radio stations under the corporate name, The Christian Broadcasting System, Ltd., and also, I own/operate CBSat, a satellite network.

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Media Broker Spotlight –
Brett Miller, MCH Enterprises, Inc.

| September 17, 2013

Talkers RadioInfo composite 2This week’s spotlighted broker:

 Brett Miller  •  MCH Enterprises, Inc.

Miller, Brett

Bergman, Sandi rev_81313

 

This interview was conducted by Sandi Bergman

 


Sandi: 
What did you do before becoming a media broker?

Miller:  I started in broadcasting in 1966, working my way through college: everything from cleaning the coffee pot, to DJ, news, and sales. I finished the BA and MA degrees while working for various radio and TV stations in the Fresno and Santa Maria markets in California. I managed several cable TV systems in California, and then did mergers and acquisitions work for a Denver-based cable TV company.  In 1989, my wife and I started consulting and brokering and our company name says it all: MCH: Miracles Can Happen. Twenty-four years and we are still in business. Along the way we also owned our own radio stations in California and Washington, which we think gives us a unique skill-set when working with owners, sellers, and buyers.

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Media Broker Spotlight –
Cliff Gardiner, Clifton Gardiner & Company, LLC

| September 10, 2013

Talkers RadioInfo composite 2This week’s spotlighted broker:

Cliff Gardiner  •  Clifton Gardiner & Company, LLC

gardinerclifton

Bergman, Sandi rev_81313

 

This interview was conducted by Sandi Bergman

 


Sandi:  What did you do before becoming a media broker?

Gardiner:  My career in radio began in 1956 as a part time weekend announcer at an Alf Landon-owned station in Liberal, Kansas.  That led to a morning DJ slot at a new AM station in Alva, Oklahoma, where I attended my first two years of college.  I also had an opportunity to work with the consulting engineer on the construction of the four-tower antenna system, including the pattern calculations (using a slide rule!).  After a couple of years I migrated to Oklahoma City and a DJ spot at KOCY, then the only rock station in the market.  Starting with the overnight shift, I graduated to afternoon drive time on the station with about 85% of the audience out of 13 stations.

While at KOMA, I applied for a construction permit for a new AM in Liberal, Kansas, built and launched it, and sold it to a local businessman.  Then back to Oklahoma City and on to a sales slot at the Storz Broadcasting station, KOMA AM.

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Media Broker Spotlight –
Dick Kozacko, Kozacko Media Services

| September 3, 2013

Talkers RadioInfo composite 2This week’s spotlighted broker:

Dick Kozacko  •  Kozacko Media Services

kozacko

Bergman, Sandi rev_81313

 

This interview was conducted by Sandi Bergman

 


Sandi:  What did you do before becoming a media broker?

Kozacko:  I’m probably one of the few Media Brokers who does not have a broadcasting background.  My background is acquisition management and market research for companies. I was doing analysis of companies or products to be acquired by another business firm. But, I always had a strong interest in broadcasting even though not working in the field. My thesis for my MBA at Boston College was analysis of radio networks and I predicted the end for the ABC network (as the weakest). Well, I was wrong on that result but this was at the time just before ABC was actually split into four radio networks. So, I was right in a way and ABC management made some significant changes.

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Media Broker Spotlight –
Dave Garland, Dave Garland Media Brokerage

| August 27, 2013

Talkers RadioInfo composite 2This week’s spotlighted broker:

Dave Garland  •   Dave Garland Media Brokerage

garland

Bergman, Sandi rev_81313

 

This interview was conducted by Sandi Bergman

 

 

Sandi:  What did you do before becoming a media broker?

Dave:  I spent many years in radio grunt work… on air, sales, etc.   My first paid non-college broadcast job was as a photographer for a TV network affiliate and I really got bit hard by the radio bug by hanging out with the folks on the radio side.   I now say I have done every job at a station from sweeping the floors to being an owner.

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Media Broker Spotlight – Doyle Hadden
Hadden & Associates Media Brokers

| August 20, 2013

Talkers RadioInfo composite 2This week’s spotlighted broker:

 Doyle Hadden  •  Hadden & Associates Media Brokers

haddendoyle

Bergman, Sandi rev_81313

 

This interview was conducted by Sandi Bergman

 


Sandi:  What did you do before becoming a media broker?  

Hadden:  Radio-TV, sales, management and ownership. I was never good enough in broadcasting to be an on-air talent, so I found a way to make money behind the scenes.

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Media Broker Spotlight –
Art Holt, Holt Media Group

| August 13, 2013

Talkers RadioInfo composite 2This week’s spotlighted broker:

 Art Holt  •  Holt Media Group

holtart

Bergman, Sandi rev_81313

 

  This interview was conducted by Sandi Bergman

 

 

Sandi:  What did you do before becoming a media broker?

Holt:  Like so many broadcasters, I started out in radio as an announcer and disc jockey, with engineering thrown into the mix.  I worked Texas medium markets including Amarillo, Lubbock, and Austin, and then I made it to the big time in Big D.  By the time I got to Dallas I had wised up a bit and was much more interested in advertising sales than in being the next Ed McMahon, so I happily left the microphone behind to hit the street with a rate card.  It turned out that I was a pretty good salesman, so next came manager gigs in some in pretty good markets…Buffalo, Boston, Chicago and San Francisco…and then some time in New York as the VP of a national radio rep company. I also got plenty of hands-on experience by personally owning and operating a successful 20 station group in good medium markets for three decades.

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Media Broker Spotight –
George Reed, Media Services Group

| August 6, 2013

Talkers RadioInfo composite 2

This week’s spotlighted broker: 

George Reed  •  Media Services Group

reedgeorge

sandi new 7-16-13

 

 This interview was conducted by Sandi Bergman.

 

 

Sandi:  What did you do before becoming a media broker?

Reed:  I worked on the “station side” of the business.  Specifically, I had just spent a decade (1977 – 1987) at WPLO/WVEE in Atlanta (Plough Broadcasting and then DKM Broadcasting), most of that as general sales manager.  While in Atlanta, I also bought WJTT in Chattanooga with Jim Brewer (1986).  And from 1982 to 1984, I got my MBA at Georgia State University in their Executive MBA program.  Before Atlanta, I worked for Bill Stakelin for a couple of years in Orlando.  And in my “childhood,” worked for Bud Walters and Jim Brewer.

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Media Broker Spotight –
Roger Rafson, CMS Station Brokerage

| July 30, 2013

Talkers RadioInfo composite 2

This week’s spotlighted broker: 

Roger Rafson  •  CMS Station Brokerage

rafson

sandi new 7-16-13

 

 This interview was conducted by Sandi Bergman.

 

 

Sandi:  What did you do before becoming a media broker?

Rafson:  I’ve been in radio since I was 11.  It’s all I’ve ever done.   I have a passion for radio.

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Media Broker Spotlight –
Mark Jorgenson, Jorgenson Broadcast Brokerage

| July 23, 2013

Talkers RadioInfo composite 2

This week’s spotlighted broker:

 Mark Jorgenson   •  Jorgenson Broadcast Brokerage

jorgrnsen

sandi new 7-16-13

 

 This interview was conducted by Sandi Bergman.

 

 

Sandi:  What did you do before becoming a media broker? 

Jorgenson:  For 12 years, I worked in television sales and sales management in Southeastern markets (Winston-Salem, Cincinnati, Miami, and Tampa).

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Media Broker Spotlight –
George Kimble, Kozacko Media Services

| July 16, 2013

Talkers RadioInfo composite 2

This week’s spotlighted broker:

 George Kimble  •  Kozacko Media Services

kimble

 

sandi new 7-16-13

 

This interview was conducted by Sandi Bergman

 

 

Sandi:  What did you do before becoming a media broker?

Kimble:  I started in radio when I was 13.  My father, who owned the station had a heart attack and died at the age of 40.  During my senior year in high school, at 17 years old, I became the morning man on my hometown station.  I’ve owned radio stations for 40 years. I have also owned some full-power and low power TV stations over the years.     I have been brokering radio and television stations on a full- time basis for eight years.

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Media Broker Spotlight –
Jerry Proctor, The Proctor Group, Inc.

| July 9, 2013

Talkers RadioInfo composite 2This week’s spotlighted broker:

Jerry Proctor  •  The Proctor Group, Inc.

proctorjerry

Bergman, Sandi rev

 

This interview was conducted by Sandi Bergman

 

 

Sandi:  What did you do before becoming a media broker? 

Proctor:  I’ve been involved in the communications industry since 1948 and in station ownership since 1961.  During the intervening period and through various companies, I have owned AM, FM, TV and LPTV stations as well as cable TV and paging systems.  Over 20 years ago, I started The Proctor Group, Inc. as a full service broadcast brokerage firm….however,  I have continued my involvement in station ownership also.  I still own four stations and am still active in station brokerage.

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Media Broker Spotlight –
Burt Sherwood, Burt Sherwood & Associates

| July 2, 2013

Talkers RadioInfo composite 2This week’s spotlighted broker:

 Burt Sherwood  •  Burt Sherwood & Associates

sherwood new

Bergman, Sandi rev

 

This interview was conducted by Sandi Bergman

 

 

Sandi:  What did you do before becoming a media broker?

Sherwood:  I am a broadcaster.  I started out as an announcer in 1947 and went from WWXL Peoria Illinois to WMCA New York.  I was there to help usher in the beginning of Rock and Roll.  Following that (immediately before brokering) I became a General Manager of radio stations, and stockholder in some, including Brattleboro, VT (WTSA) Portland, Me (WLOB) and Albany, NY (WTRY).  Other stations that I managed and/or held stock included WNHC, New Haven, CT; WMEE /WMEF Ft. Wayne, IN (plus others in the group);  WIBG, Philadelphia; and WMAQ/WKQX, Chicago, for NBC.

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Media Broker Spotlight –
Glen Dingley, Kingtron, Inc.

| June 25, 2013

Talkers RadioInfo composite 2This week’s spotlighted broker:

 Glen Dingley  •  Kingtron, Inc.

Dingley, Glen

Bergman, Sandi rev

 

This interview was conducted by Sandi Bergman

 

 

Sandi:  What did you do before becoming a media broker?

Dingley:  Chief engineer.  I am unique in that I have been involved in broadcast engineering for the last 30 years. I bring a different prospective for my clients and evaluations in that I know the station equipment better than anyone. So much equipment is outdated and incompatible out there. My clients really respect my insights and advice. When you are buying or selling a station, you are mainly purchasing equipment with which to broadcast. Station personnel, policies, and other assets can change, but without good equipment, you are not competitive.

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Media Broker Spotlight –
Edward F. Seeger, Seeger Media, LLC

| June 18, 2013


Talkers RadioInfo composite 2

This week’s spotlighted broker:

 Edward F. Seeger   •   Seeger Media, LLC

Seeger, Ed 250

Bergman, Sandi rev

 

This interview was conducted by Sandi Bergman

 

 

Sandi:  What did you do before becoming a media broker?  

Seeger:  I worked in radio for the past 48 years, starting out as an announcer then moving on into programming, sales, management and then ownership. Founded several companies that provided services to the industry including American Media Services, LLC which was a radio development and brokerage firm. Then founded digital companies including www.theradio.com and then two years ago formed Seeger Media, LLC www.seegermedia.com  which is focused on radio brokerage, consulting and digital platforms for radio and for major brands.

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