Mike Kinosian

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Saturday, January 3, 2015

| January 3, 2015

Albany, Knoxville Set to Pick Up Sports Outlets. For more than five years, Kirkland Wireless’ WVLZ, Knoxville used “Tennessee Sports Radio” as its handle, until transitioning to classic hits-oldies in late-August last year (2014). Its tenure as a classic hits-oldies outlet is extremely short-lived: On Monday (1/5), WVLZ will return to its sports roots as “1180 The Volz.” Program director Seth Stokes and Jayson Swain will handle 7:00 am – 10 am duties; Jon Reed and Kyle Tasman-hosted “Four Quarters” follows for one hour (10:00 am – 11:00 am); and Dave Hooker is slotted for 11:00 am -1:00 pm. Yahoo! Sports Radio will supply the bulk of the station’s other programming. Meanwhile, one week from Monday (1/12), Pamal Broadcasting Albany (New York) will jettison adult alternative on WZMR “The Peak” in favor of “Win 104.9” (and new callers – WINU). “Win” will carry CBS Sports Radio programming, most recently heard in that market on cross-town Empire Broadcasting‘s WPTR, which becomes an NBC Sports Radio affiliate. Neither WVLZ nor WZMR appeared in print in their respective market’s most recent Nielsen Audio quarterly ratings report.

Friday, January 2, 2015

| January 2, 2015

Remembering Mario Cuomo. “You campaign in poetry – you govern in prose.” The person responsible for that memorable quote knew a little something about election campaigns, given that he won re-election twice as New York State’s chief executive. Although a leading Democratic presidential contender in 1988 and 1992, Mario Cuomo never formally entered either one of those races. Cuomo, 82, died yesterday (New Year’s Day), after a lengthy hospital stay to treat a heart ailment. The liberal/progressive Cuomo famously challenged Ronald Reagan directly by proclaiming, “There is despair, Mr. President, in the faces that you don’t see, in the places that you don’t visit in your shining city.” Born in an apartment above the grocery store owned by his immigrant parents in South Jamaica, Queens, Cuomo rooted his policies in what he called, “progressive pragmatism.” Political persuasion aside, most would agree that Cuomo was a passionate orator. It, therefore, came as no surprise that he was recruited to be a local and syndicated radio talk show host. Not everyone, however, was impressed as evidenced by David Hinckley‘s comments in the New York Daily News. “As good as he could be on television, he was that bad when he tried to host on the radio,” Hinckley opines of Cuomo, who was hired by New York City’s WABC-AM. “He was still brilliant [but] for the year or so the show ran, he was almost unlistenable. It wasn’t his fault – he didn’t suddenly become inarticulate or stupid. It is just that most of the things his admirers liked about him were exactly wrong for radio.” The WABC-AM venture began in spring 1995, and as Hinckley recalls, the former governor “wanted it to be a reasonable, considered, thoughtful discussion – not, as talk radio had frequently become – people screaming at each other and hurling insults. In the abstract, he succeeded in that mission. He ran a calm, thoughtful show in which he encouraged those who disagreed with his views to call and have a rational conversation.” It is Hinckley’s contention though that Cuomo’s “monologues tended to sound professorial, as if he were explaining something to a class and – through no fault of his own – random talk radio callers rarely turn out to be someone with whom a host can hold an extended, thoughtful, academic-level conversation.” Whereas Rush Limbaugh at the time was doing a daily three-hour WABC-AM show, Cuomo hosted one weekend program and as Hinckley points out, fronting a radio show is different from being a talk radio show guest. “Cuomo was [a guest] many times, and often a very good one,” Hinckley comments. “It does not disparage him, or his achievements, that his radio show goes down alongside his New York City mayoral bid as a swing and a miss.”Mario Cuomo was the father of five, including New York’s present governor Andrew Cuomo and CNN journalist Chris Cuomo.

Wednesday, December 31, 2014

| December 31, 2014

Alpha Media, Buckley Communications Close Six-Station Purchase. The sextet of California properties Alpha Media officially acquires from Buckley Broadcasting of California are in Bakersfield (urban-rhythmic oldies KKBB “Groove 99.3,” CHR KLLY “Kelly 95.3,” and talk combo KNZR-AM & KNZR-FM) and Merced (rhythmic CHR KHTN “Hot 104.7” and KUBB “Country 96.3”). Alpha Media chairman Larry Wilson comments, “We are privileged to buy these stations from such great operators. The Buckley clusters are a great addition to our ‘live-and-local’ west coast footprint.” Buckley Broadcasting & Communications president and chief operating officer Joseph Bilotta remarks, “As we close this transaction with Alpha, Buckley Broadcasting is effectively void of broadcast assets for the first time in 58 years. To all who worked for our family-owned-and-operated business over these decades, we thank you again and wish Alpha great success in Bakersfield and Merced.” Portland-based Alpha Media now owns 86 stations in 16 markets.